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The Sheet Test

Recently I’ve been under some expert guidance in correcting some movement imbalances that I have accumulated. After nearly fifteen years of weightlifting in various forms, I can claim only a few injuries but some nuances that have become dysfunctional movement patterns. Rather than force my

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Can’t Versus Won’t: Fitness and Motivation

Some of my Autism Fitness athletes have a tendency to wait a couple seconds before performing the activity-in-question. Sometimes it is a processing delay, and, on occasion (see also; Regularly), it is because the exercise/activity is not inherently reinforcing enough for them to immediately invest

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Operational Definitions

  An Operational Definition clarifies exactly what we are talking about in relation to a “thing,” whether it be performing a squat or asking politely for a sombrero. Because we human beings often have different expectations, it is important to distinguish just what we’re talking

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Powerlifting and Autism: Connections

Powerlifting focuses on three  lifts; Squat, Deadlift, and Bench press.  The highly-specified programming in powerlifting requires a lot of time and focus on those three movements to ensure a high level of mastery.  Each lift is practiced many, many times to develop proper mechanics, feel

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The Low end of Adaptive: Behavior Support with Fitness

I’ve worked with a range of individuals on the autism spectrum with respect to Physical, Adaptive, and Cognitive functioning.  On the low end of adaptive/behavioral abilities, aggressive or self-injurious behavior can be a concern.  As a fitness professional, or someone who is providing an ongoing

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Improving Expectations

Consistency in expectation is a key component of Autism Fitness programming. My athletes know what to expect from me, and I know what they are capable of doing. This is not an immediate situation, but one that develops through building a rapport with an individual.

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The Information Sieve: Autism, Healthy Living, and a Big Fat Gap

One of our we-don’t-want-it-to-be-a-secret secrets in the strength and fitness community is that we ( the learned and practiced strength and fitness community, both professional and enthusiast), have know a lot about gaining and maintaining health for some time (circa early 1900’s). Resistance training for

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When to end a Session (and How to Keep it Going)

Autism Fitness sessions with my athletes typically last about an hour. Therapists, fitness professionals, we typically work on either a 45 minute to 1 hour session time frame. Some of us even get fancy and do a “professional” hour, which translates to 50 minutes. But

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Objects vs. Objectives Revisited

One of the central concepts in Autism Fitness programming is Objects vs. Objectives. Recently I overheard a discussion between two parents regarding use and access to a treadmill for one of their teens on the spectrum. Now why a treadmill? Because of the current overwhelmingly

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The Art of Crap Coaching (And how to Remedy it)

As my 10-year-old athlete “Nick” dashes through a circuit of Sandbell overhead presses, overhead walks, squats to a Dynamax ball, and jumping rope swings, I hear the grand old sound of sport-specific coaching for children. About a hundred yards away from our playground fitness empire,

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