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The Magnetic Nature of Movement

This past Sunday my friend and I were playing in a local parking lot. Our activity involved lifting up some 75 and 90 lb. steelĀ  blocks by their handles, carrying them about 50 yards, and then picking up some rather hefty medicine balls and throwing

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Gaining (Play)Ground for young individuals with autism

I was speaking with a colleague today about the goal of fitness programs for my young athletes with autism. The two main concepts are Structure and Randomness. For many children with autism, movement is aversive and deficits, or lagging physical abilities can interfere with developing

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Generalizing Movement Patterns, Autism Fitness Style

The reasons behind teaching exercises in smaller, incremental units are: 1) A movement pattern requiring several steps may be too challenging to learn all at once 2) Physical limitations including gross motor deficits may be present, which can inhibit optimal movement 3) Teaching the exercise

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More Movement Patterns for Autism Athletes

In Motor Planning, ABA, and the Autism Athlete, I demonstrated a chained activity that involved a sequence of mastered targets. As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, I want to provide live, unedited examples of my sessions. There are certainly behavioral challenges that are unique to

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Motor Planning, ABA, and the Autism Athlete

ABA as a teaching methodology suits fitness and motor planning perfectly for children and young individuals with autism. We always have to develop the pre-requisite skills to any activity or program before being able to perform it independently, and with any success. For many young

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We Have Liftoff…

Jumping is a complex activity. In addition to being an essential ingredient for play skills, jumping requires some complex motor planning, balance, agility, and power. Just get up off your computer chair right now and jump up. Now jump forward, back, left and right. Sit

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The video era begins…

This is a “typical” session with one of my athletes with autism. We’ve been working hard at developing basic pre-requisite skills including bending, jumping, and extending the arms. You’ll notice some off-task behavior, which is an opportunity to incorporate some redirection, prompting, and behavior-specific praise

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It’s coming…

More content. More videos. More information on how you can create and implement fitness programs for children and young people with autism. In the next few days we will be adding some AWESOME videos including interviews and fitness session footage to the blog page. Live

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Rhythm and Movement

You get home from a busy day working with children with autism or your own child on the spectrum, and here I am rambling about rhythm. Here’s the thing, though; All movement is based in rhythm, and many children with autism have difficulty performing movements

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The Austin AFI Wrap-Up

I just returned from the first Austin Autism Fitness Initiative and finally have full use of my voice. As always with my seminars, I continue to be both humbled and inspired by those attendees I meet and their stories. From parents to educators to fitness